Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Introducing Jackie Kerr

135 artists featured in "Inside Job" which took place on the 7th and 8th of April on Level 6 of Tate Modern and was visited by over 3,000 people. The Rebel Magazine has been chatting to some of the Tate staff who showed their artwork. Today it's the turn of Jackie Kerr
Q) Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in Falkirk, Scotland and had a normal comprehensive school education before I then studied at Edinburgh Art College for a B.A (Hons) Degree in Fine Art, specialising in Printmaking. I then moved to Gorgeous Liverpool to study at John Moores University for my P.G.C.E Course in Secondary Art and Design Education."
Q) How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? After I studied at John Moores University I then left Liverpool to teach in Leeds for 8 years as a Secondary Art and Design Teacher. I returned to the city I love, Liverpool, in 2004 and was delighted to start working for Tate Liverpool as a Casual Visitor Experience Assistant in 2008 for their amazing Gustav Klimt Exhibition. As that year was also our 'Capital of Culture Year' and the year we hosted the prestigious Turner Prize I would certainly have to say that, because that particular Summer has such a memorable place in my heart and If I really had to choose one show that as been my favourite / best experience of an exhibition then, it would have to be that one.
Q) What can you tell me about the work that you exhibited in the Tate Modern show? "First of all, can I just say I, and my wee family, were very delighted and excited to be included in your Staff Exhibition at Tate Modern. So thank you to all involved who organised, contributed and who we, from Tate Liverpool, met during your special weekend. For your great exhibition I was proud to exhibit a new acrylic painting and collage on paper entitled 'Grid Reference' which represents a journey taken and / or imagined through many of the cities I have lived in over many years."
Q) How can people find out more about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? At Tate Liverpool we are a group of Independent, Freelance Artists who get together on occasions to exhibit Locally, Nationally and Internationally and therefore we are collectively known as 'SCI' or 'Soup Collective International'. "We have a website which is Art in Liverpool under the Artists' Section: http://www.artinliverpool.com/kerr-jacqueline-f/
Q) Is there anything you have to declare / do you have a favourite quote, thought or joke you'd care to share? From 'Nature Boy' by David Bowie......'the greatest thing you will ever learn is just to love and be loved in return...!' ('Moulin Rouge' Film Soundtrack version by Baz Luhrman is Magic!) Q) What's the best thing about working for the Tate? "I absolutely love our camaraderie here in Liverpool as I feel very lucky and priviledged to be surrounded and supported by my great colleagues who I regard as friends. After 10 years as a 'Casual' I am now delighted to be, from this January 2018 onwards, a Permanent Member of Staff as a Retail Assistant within our Tate Enterprises Shop so I'm even more happier to be working for Tate."
"Inside Job": An exhibition of art by Tate Staff will took place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG Click here to see You Tube footage of Jackie's work at the opening night of Inside Job.

Introducing Chloe Louise Lawrence

135 artists featured in "Inside Job" which took place on the 7th and 8th of April on Level 6 of Tate Modern and was visited by over 3,000 people. The Rebel Magazine has been chatting to some of the Tate staff who showed their artwork. Today it's the turn of Chloe Louise Lawrence
Q) Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born and grew up in Woolwich, which is right on the River Thames in South East London. I grew up drawing and always making things, and despite not having university or ‘creative’ backgrounds, I was definitely encouraged and influenced by both my parents. My Mum always had a hand at sewing, fabric construction and repairing… and she’d also take pride in the interior of our home, crafting surfaces and different wall hangings- making our modular council flat an individual home. I remember one time she covered our white boxed kitchen cupboards with this bright ultramarine textured vinyl- it kind of made the kitchen look like a space ship! My late Dad also, he was a lorry driver and I have many memories as a child of going to work with him when I wasn’t at school, and just being surrounded by tools and construction. He also had a knack for drawing, which perhaps inspired me to do so as well. I attended my local all girls secondary school, where I completed a BTEC National Diploma in Art & Design instead of the GCSE; and I went on to do A Levels in Art and English Literature in Sixth Form college. However, it wasn’t until my Sixth Form college tutor suggested that I did an art foundation [after frantically scrambling over UCAS and wondering how the heck I was going to get into university with only two A Levels and what else I was going to do with my life] that I made the decision or realisation that I could go to art school. He pointed me in the direction of Camberwell College of Arts, which was where I discovered that I could embed myself in this world of art and really make it a thing. I stayed at Camberwell to complete my Bachelors in Painting, graduating in 2014. After all this, I am now still in arts education and still in South London, studying at the Royal College of Arts for my Masters in Print."
Q) How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? I started working within the Tate shops for the Alexander Calder show in 2015, and now just over two and a half years later, I’m a permanent member of staff working every weekend in that crazy structure that is the River Shop as you walk in on the front of the Tate Modern building. The best show I’ve seen? I think my most memorable has to be the Rachel Whiteread Turbine Hall installation EMBANKMENT back in 2005. I was 14 and even though I grew up in South East London, it was the first time I’d ever gone to Tate Modern before. I remember walking into the building and just being confronted with these towering glowing boxes, filling up the vast space of the Turbine Hall, and really taking it over. I was in absolute awe. I went with my Mum, Step Dad and sister, and we just ran around the polyethylene structures of cardboard boxes, hiding, getting lost and exploring. It was an exciting day for me. My Mum was already aware of my growing interest in art, and kept asking me what I thought it meant.
Q) What can you tell me about the work that you exhibited in the Tate Modern show? "My practice has involved using the methods and processes of printmaking as a way of recording time within everyday spaces, of domestic labour and of the workplace. The work I exhibited ‘Portrait of a Floor (Ann's Linoleum Parcay)’, is a framed relief print onto paper, depicting a section of linoleum imitation parquet flooring taken from my Grandmas old kitchen, which I ripped out for her. It captures marks embedded and created through use and time, such as the hole where the door stop used to screw in and a spot where the floor has had something melted into its surface. Personified as a portrait, the work draws attention to and gives significance to the subtle marks that are traces of repeated moments. The work also plays on class and a hierarchy of materials. Linoleum, used as an affordable and accessible material for home interiors, is also alternatively used as a fine art printmaking process adopted by the likes of Erich Heckel, Picasso and even Matisse. Having the opportunity to show this piece within the Tate Modern, adds an extra layer, or actually dissolves it perhaps… bringing this everyday used floor from a home in South London imprinted with age and labour, into an institution- and to share space with the likes of Picasso and even Matisse."
Q) How can people find out more about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? I do have a website www.chloelouiselawrence.co.uk I also have instagram and twitter, which I regularly post about things I am making in the studio and future shows —> @chloelouisse.
Q) What's the best thing about working for the Tate? "The colleagues, the team, the mates! Everyone who I work with. I think there’s such a solid ground-workforce here at Tate, of people who are all doing so many interesting things no matter what they’re field is, and I guess we’re all trying to navigate that. There’s so much support in this place and that’s why it’s been great to finally have this show pulled together."
"Inside Job": An exhibition of art by Tate Staff will took place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Introducing Cath von Isenburg

135 artists featured in "Inside Job" which took place on the 7th and 8th of April on Level 6 of Tate Modern and was visited by over 3,000 people. The Rebel Magazine has been chatting to some of the Tate staff who showed their artwork. Today it's the turn of Cath von Isenburg
Q) Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in Nairobi. Within eighteen months of me being born we were posted to Bahrain, a few years after that to Kolkata then again to Malaysia, then Singapore, HongKong and finally back to Nairobi again. For the formative years of all this traveling my education was in these other countries, well up until Singapore that is.I have very fond memories of Tanglin Infant school in Singapore. Those early years were full of wonder and inspiration from the variety of cultures I absorbed as I grew. It’s when I look back, I realise we lived without a television in Kolkata but I enjoyed so many other things, being creative, reading and playing. Something devastating came though and swept away some of that playfulness of childhood forcing me to grow up and learn the harsh realities of life early. This was to take the form of Cancer, one which my mum battled against but tragically lost her life to when I was eight years old. I hold on to the memories, the fact that my mum, like my dad was creative but I think that creativity in her was contagious and we all got a part of it. From the age of eight I started boarding school here in the UK. I ended up going through school a year ahead of myself, the intake age being eleven. I would be lying if I say this wasn’t tough but I got on and made some friends and yes we had the occasional midnight feasts in the dormitories, built fantastical dens in the woods and ate meals at very long wooden tables.After sixth form spent boarding, I went on to do a foundation diploma in art and design at Central Saint Martins and a BA (Hons) in textiles from Winchester School of Art. A while later I undertook a part time MA in Illustration at the Anglia Ruskin in Cambridge, just as I started working at the Tate."
Q) How long have you been working at Tate and what’s the best show you've seen there? "I can’t believe that this year, this summer I have actually been working at the Tate part time for ten years! I did take a year out for maternity leave when my daughter was born but I do have to confess that is now over five years ago. It’s difficult to pin point one best show but I think that the Calder show had the edge for me. I love the ‘Cirque Calder’ and it was wonderful to see parts of this, the beautifully made kinetic sculptures and the moving mobiles. The gallery came to life in a magical way. I also have a very good memory of the Henry Moore exhibition at Tate Britain. It was a moment where both my dad and myself felt truly inspired to sit in the show and draw together. It’s moments like these that you cherish."
Q) What can you tell me about the work you exhibited in the Tate Modern show? My work ‘Objects From Life’ was one that I undertook at the start of my MA with regards to the drawings themselves. The first module was focused on observational drawing. I went out and about and had a great time drawing lots in sketchbooks in various museums and galleries including the Horniman, the British Museum, Sir John Soane’s, to name a few. I also began to focus on objects I have at home, the meanings behind them. The objects feel significant in different ways, of memorable moments, of times gone by and loved ones that are lost. Theres a gold plated teaspoon with our family crest on handed down to me by my gran, an acorn necklace which my mum wore most of the time. Some now dried flowers hold a little note behind them identifying them as ‘lucky’ as they landed on my head when I was a child at a festival in Kathmandu. There is an exquisitely painted wooden egg from our house boat holiday in Kashmir. As part of my artistic practice I also enjoy experimenting in three dimensions and make three dimensional characters. I made the doll with the big hair and then decided to draw her. All these objects exist in three dimensions. I like to lose myself in the detail when drawing and funnily enough this is the same in most of my more imaginative work.
Q) How can people find out more about your work - do you have a website or Instagram? I have a website www.thiscuriousworld.com. I am also busy making work for a group exhibition which will be on at the Hoxton Arches gallery from the 30th of May until the 10th of June this year.
Q) Is there anything you would like to declare / do you have a favourite quote, thought or joke you’d care to share? "Two things really, I think it’s important to show people you care about that you do and one can’t do that too often in my books. I was also recently inspired by a writer, Liz Petrone. I follow her blog. Theres a great piece ‘What if we danced?’. It made me chuckle, as a fellow mother, but was also wholly thought provoking, a great piece of writing. Staying positive against all odds is probably key."
"Inside Job": An exhibition of art by Tate Staff will took place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tuesday, 10 April 2018

Introducing Anna Titov

135 artists featured in "Inside Job" which took place on the 7th and 8th of April on Level 6 of Tate Modern and was visited by over 3,000 people. The Rebel Magazine has been chatting to some of the Tate staff who showed their artwork. Today it's the turn of Anna Titov
Q) Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in Moscow and lived there until my family moved to sunny Walthamstow, East London, when I was 3 years old. I lived in Potsdam near Berlin when I was 10, and then returned to Berlin for another year when I was studying. I grew up painting and studied art up to GCSE level in school but in the end I went to Queen Mary to do a BA in German and linguistics (focusing mostly on German philosophy towards the end) and I continued making art on the side. This is when I started to get into comics and cartoons and I ended up doing regular strips for the campus newspaper. Since graduating I've gone back to art full-time as a lazy illustrator mostly but I'm in the process of applying for a drawing MA for next year.
Q) How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "I started working at Tate full time during the World Goes Pop and Alexander Calder exhibitions in late 2015. I'm now on zero hours and come in about once a month for a shift and a gossip. My favourite show might actually be Alexander Calder. I loved how each work produced shadows that changed from every perspective you looked at them from, especially the portraits and their expressions. They were like suspended 3D line drawings. It was the only exhibition where I preferred walking around with a crowd around me, because all that hustle made the mobiles float around gently."
Q) What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate Modern show? Last year I went back to Russia for the first time since I was a child and I had a very difficult time there for many reasons, mostly because I had to take on the role of foreigner in a place that I have a strong cultural connection to from my upbringing but that I also feel completely separate from with regards to its current political climate. I'm slowly trying out painting again after a long break. The imagery is made up of childhood memories, Soviet films I grew up watching, and rooms I've slept in. St Basil's Cathedral is a very colourful and happy-looking place that seemed like a harsh contrast to how I felt while I was there, and it kept popping up in my dreams after I came back like it was taunting me, kind of like Pennywise from It.
Q) How can people find out more about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? I have an Instagram @aatitov but due to my life being a big joke I don't actually have a smartphone so my posts are rather rare for now. I have also spent about 2 years (definitely too long) working collaboratively with a friend on a children's book and if I finally pull my socks up it should be published this Summer. It's about a tree that goes to sea.
Q) What's the best thing about working for the Tate? "It's a very inclusive and non-judgemental group of people, you always feel like you're working with your close friends no matter what position you're all in. I started working at Tate with neon orange hair and clothes that looked like they'd been in battle and no managers ever said a thing. Aside from the time where I wore Crocs to work every day. They said something then."
"Inside Job": An exhibition of art by Tate Staff will took place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Monday, 9 April 2018

Introducing Jennifer Vacher

135 artists featured in "Inside Job" which took place on the 7th and 8th of April on Level 6 of Tate Modern and was visited by over 3,000 people. The Rebel Magazine has been chatting to some of the Tate staff who showed their artwork. Today it's the turn of Jennifer Vacher
Q) Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I grew up in south east London with my mum and received my secondary education at Bexley Grammar School & Sixth Form. I studied art as one of my GCSEs, which I thoroughly enjoyed until one of my teachers started lacking interest in my work due to our conflicting tastes, and so I soon found it uninspiring and went on to focus on languages whilst doing the International Baccalaureate. I then went on to study French and Italian at University of Leeds, but sadly had to drop out after a year and a half due to ill health. This September, I'll be starting Ba Scandinavian Studies (focusing on Norwegian language) at UCL, which is incredibly exciting. My greatest inspiration at school, however, was my English teacher for the IB, who really encouraged and nurtured my interest in literature, and who actually inspired me to begin writing poetry, a book of which I published in September 2016."
Q) How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "I started working at Tate when the new extension opened, so it's coming up to two years now. My favourite show during my time working there was definitely Soul of a Nation - it was incredibly refreshing to see such a varied range of work from an important period of modern history in one exhibition that wasn't dominated by or focused on white male artists."
Q) What can you tell me about the work you exhibited in the Tate Modern show? 'Untitled (Portrait)' is a raw and intimate example of self reflection that stemmed from the poem featured in the middle, which was written approx. a year and a half ago, following a period of severe mental illness and hospitalisation. The actual paintings that feature came at later dates, when I was in a position to reflect upon the themes in the poem once again. The idea of the piece is to present the feeling of a gradual descent into uncertainty and fragility, which is why I predominantly used the colour green and strung the piece up using just pegs and string. I'm glad I was able to show it in the Inside Job Exhibition, as it is a reminder of what I have overcome now that I am able to freely display such a vulnerable aspect of my past.
Q) How can people find out more about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? I have an Instagram: @jenniferelizabethvacher and you can find my book on Amazon here
Q) Is there anything you have to declare / do you have a favourite quote, thought or joke you'd care to share? "not / all matterings of mind / equal one violet" - from poem 64 of 95 Poems by E. E. Cummings
"Inside Job": An exhibition of art by Tate Staff will took place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Saturday, 7 April 2018

50 Inside Job Photos

Below are 50 photos related to Tate Modern's Inside Job exhibition which had over 3,000 visits in two days.
Above: Tommy Douglas and Aimee Murphy with Tate Modern's director Frances Morris.
Above: "Say cheese" Ola Wu
Above: Sid-oufik Bouzar
Elliot Walker Hall, Mikei Hall & Dom Kennedy
Above: Fred Postles in his 3-D specs tripping out to work by Olga Suchanova
Above: A close up on Andrew Wyatt's painting
Above: Tate legend Simon Fisher
Above: Yeter Aydemir
Above: Pierre Julien et Jane Brannigan
Above: Eve and Jen
Above: Ms Caparros and her chums
Above: Making a spectacle
Above: Karoline and Jumpei
Above: Max and Sukie
Above: Fans of Aiden G.D. Moore
Above: Aimee Murphy with a painting by Richard Mittens
Above: The Three Amigos
Above: One artist made a life size cut of their mother (holding a gun) which was attached to a train set.
Above: Samanta & Gerry
Above: Margi and Justin
Above: Mildred the Cat
Above: John & Roberta
Above: A Tate curator who wished to remain anonymous
Above: Read all about it here
Above: WillKay
Above: Willkay plus daughter
Above: Chris Browne, Tommy Douglas, Samanta Bellotta, Aimee Murphy, Frances Morris, Andrew Wyatt, Harry Pye, Max Reeves.
Above: Opening night, 7pm
Above: Mandy & Maria (from Tate Catering)
Above: A young visitor gives Mandy & Maria's Jelly Butt a playful spank
Above: A bit of performance art
Above: An important member of the Inside Job team - Mr Michael Freer
Above: Art fans Andrew and Jasper proudly hold their Inside Job badges aloft.
Above: Sarah Wood smiling
Above: Cath von Isenburg's Objects From Life included drawings, fabrics and mirrors.
Above: Rachelle Allen-Sherwood with Jumpei Kinoshita
Above: Part of a naked lady tea set
Above: Tate legend Corey Samuel poses proudly next to his work
Above: Alice Ellis-Brayin the middle, Jade Bowmer on the right.
Above: Peter Turner
Above: A young fan marvels at photos by Max Reeves
Above: Russell Carr is shocked to see artist Raksha Patel
Above: Sarah Crowe's homage to Elizabeth G
Above: Work by Joka van Wijk
Above: Chris Browne next to a painting by Sarah Wood
Above: Red Square by Anna Titov
Above: Team Beswick and Pye in front of "Come On In, The Water's Lovely"
Above: Robert Reynard giving a talk about Raksha Patel's work
Above: I'm Not Looking For Mrs Barbera Map by Sarah Carne
Above: Samanata Bellotta's photo of the Clicker on Sunday
Above: Mildred the Tate Modern cat MORE PHOTOS ON THEIR WAY ***** The artists whose work featured in Inside Job include; Izna Bandey, Hayley Ash, Fred Postles, Corey Samuel, Christina Mitrentse, Charlotte Barlow, Aphra Lupita, Anna Reading, Andrew Page, Adrianna Wlosek, Zoe Hunt, Zerrin Asir, Sayra Begum, Rita Szabados, Patricia Pisanelli, Ocean Farini, Michelangelo Arteaga, Kelise Franclemont, Kaveh Ossia, Johnny Gordon, Jane Brannigan, Victoria Karlsson, Tom Allen, Sarah Crowe, Ellinna Horton, Cath von Isenburg, Thomas Douglas, Shino Saegusa Shino, Mandy Niewohner, Grażyna Siedlecka, Chris Timms, Agnese Saggia, Yuichiro Kikuma, Willkay, Wendy Williams, Thomas Grantham, Tara Wellesley, Stephanie Biddle, Shireen Qureshi, Sebastian Wańkowicz, Sarah Carne, Rose Carroll, Raksha Patel, Pierre Julien, Peter Turner, Paula Hillis , Omar Castaneda, Olivia Milani, Myrddin Wooding, Michael Bolton, Max Reeves, Matt Siwerski, Lloyd Ellis, Lewis Jones, Ed Leea, Klarita Pandolfi Carr, Kenneth Price, Katarzyna Rakowska Jumpei Kinoshita, John Holland, Jono Ganz, Joe Richardson, Joao Trindade, Joanna Weller, Jennifer Vacher, Jackie Kerr, Isabel Pina Ferreira, Isaac Willis, Imogen Frost, Hwa Seon Yang, Gordon Beswick and Harry Pye, Gerry King Gerald Mc Aree, Ed Hadfield, Charlotte Lee, Caitlin Parks, Bayryam Bayryamali, Arturo Saudella, Anna Titov, Anke Sievers, Andrew Wyatt, Andrea Tierney, Alice Ellis-Bray, Alex Harding, Alex Day, Akiko Takizawa, Aiden Moore, Abigail Stokes, Abita Aldridge, Evar Hussayni, Demelza Watts, Dave Keeping, Cyrus Shroff, Chris Browne, Chris Else, Sarah Wood, Rose Williams, Sarah Wood, Rose Williams, Patrick Michalopoulos, Lloyd Durling, Huguette de Chassiron, Federica Mariuzzo, Clair Cartwright, Chloe Louise Lawrence, Adam Wozniak, Steve Lockett, Seraphina Neville, Ruth Morrissey, Richard Mittens, Miriam Luehrs, Jade Bowmer, Heena Patel, Federica Beretta, Chris Daniels, Chigdem Karadogan, Sarah Powell, Joka van Wijk, Carolyn Lucas, Caroline Willoughby-Foster, Ted Brunning, Raisa Bosich, Elizabeth Cufley, Liadain Evans, Kyriaki Mitsou, Jorge Migoya Dago, Andrew Locke, Jing Eldarin Yeong, Olga Suchanova, Andra Simons. Congratulations to one and all!