Saturday, 20 July 2019

Introducing Stephanie Croydon

Over 100 artists are taking part in The Tate Staff Biennale which will take place on the last week of August on Level 5 of Tate Modern. Over the next few weeks The Rebel Magazine will be chatting to some of the Tate staff who are showing their artwork. Today it's the turn of Stephanie Croydon
Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in South Yorkshire and lived there until I was 18. I went to a comprehensive school and stayed on into sixth form but I wasn’t encouraged to pursue art as a career. I then moved to Cornwall and went down a different career path for a few years. In my late 20’s I enrolled on an Art and Design access course and then studied Ba (Hons) Contemporary Creative Practice with Plymouth University."
How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "I have been working for Tate for just over 2 years. I loved Yayoi Kusama at Tate Modern in 2012. Kusamas’ dedication to her practice and the immersive installation of dots in infinitely mirrored space was remarkable. I also really enjoyed ‘Virginia Woolf: An exhibition inspired by her writings’, Tate St Ives 2018. This exhibition showcased a variety of pieces by women from 1850 onwards, highlighting feminist perspectives and women’s suffrage.
What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate modern show? "I am exhibiting one landscape painting which is taken from a larger body of work called ‘Out West’, created with the starting point of looking in more depth at the ancient Cornish landscape. Evolving from my previous work; looking at how the world touches us on an emotional level, continually questioning our movement in the landscape. Places for quiet contemplation, where we can be still from the world."
How can people find out about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? My website: here Instagram: here Facebook page: www.facebook.com/stephaniecroydon.art
What's the best thing about working at the Tate? "Everybody is lovely! I am continuously inspired to keep going with my own practice through the exhibitions, talks and resources I am lucky to have access to."
The Tate Staff Biennale will take place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Thursday, 11 July 2019

How Lee Church of England Primary School celebrated their anniversary on the 12th July 1984

On the 12th of July 1984 there was a parade with pupils, teachers and clergy dressed in period costume which celebrated the 150th Anniversary of Lee Church of England Primary School.
The event was written about in the local newspaper...
Back in '84 someone told my mother that if she asked nicely, The Mercury would let her have copies of the photos they took. In the photo below (I'm the boy in the middle) and you can see that a list of "Rules for Teachers" has been framed. I'm not sure how genuine this amusing artifact is, but it is interesting to think how much the lives of teachers have changed.
The Rules for Teachers 1872
1) Teachers each day will fill lamps, trim the wicks and clean chimneys. 2) Each morning teacher will bring a bucket of water and a scuttle of coal for the days session. 3) Make your pens carefully. You may whittle nibs to the individual taste of the pupils. 4) Men teachers may take one evening each week for courting purposes, or two evenings a week if they attend church regularly. 5) After ten hours in school, the teachers may spend the remaining time reading the Bible or any other good books. 6) Women teachers who marry or engage is unseemly conduct will be dismissed. 7) Every teacher should lay aside from each pay a goodly sum of his earnings for his benefit during his declining years so he will not become a burden on society. 8) Any teacher who smokes, uses liquor in any form, frequents pool or public halls, or gets shaved in a barber shop will give good reason to suspect his worth, intention, integrity and honesty.
The newspaper clipping mentions ex Lee C of E pupil Colin Moynihan showing up. Lord Moynihan studied Philosophy at Oxford, was Minister for Sport in Thatcher's government and later worked for Tate & Lyle.
Despite his many achievements, Lord Moynihan is not Lee C of E's most famous pupil, sadly that honour goes to Richard Reid.

Wednesday, 10 July 2019

Introducing Scherry Shi

Over 100 artists are taking part in The Tate Staff Biennale which will take place on the last week of August on Level 5 of Tate Modern. Over the next few weeks The Rebel Magazine will be chatting to some of the Tate staff who are showing their artwork. Today it's the turn of Scherry Shi.
Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born and raised in China from where I was trained to be a fine artist. I moved to London to study design courses at Central Saint Martins and I am returning to school for MA at Royal College of Art this year."
How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "It’s been nearly a year since I worked at Tate. There have been so many great exhibitions I’ve seen in Tate over years! Yayoi Kusama, Wolfgang Tillmans, Damien Hirst, Matisse… too many to mention. I think the ones I enjoyed the most in the last 2 years are David Hockney exhibition at Tate Britain and Joan Jonas at Tate Modern."
What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate modern show? "The work I’ll be showing is a series of photographs I took at a transportation node for mined and processed ores in South Africa. Inspired by the movement of mining commodities and the way in which the mining industry is reshaping, a narrative has been developed to depict the every-day fast paced working industrial landscape in 21st century’s South Africa. Beyond observing the spatial changes of the industry, this work also raises several key questions surrounding the values of the diaspora - people who relocated or got dislocated within the process, the geographical migration of the industry, and the impacts of technology on them."
How can people find out about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? "I’m currently working on my website, you can find me on Instagram: here What's the best thing about working at the Tate? "Always the people. Everyone works in Tate is talented and passionate about art, you learn from people everyday."
The Tate Staff Biennale will take place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Monday, 8 July 2019

Introducing Natasha Vassiliou

Over 150 artists are showing their work in The Tate Staff Biennale which will take place on the last week of August on Level 5 of Tate Modern. Over the next few weeks The Rebel Magazine will be chatting to some of the Tate staff who are showing their artwork. Today we say Hello to Natasha Vassiliou...
Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in London and grew up in Cyprus. While studying for my A Levels, I also worked amongst other practicing artists connected to the Cyprus College of Art. After moving to the UK, I took a foundation course at Central St Martins (UAL) and then a BA in Graphics and Media Design in Advertising at LCC (UAL). Realising I wanted to take a different direction with my work, I studied for a Graduate Diploma in Photography at LCC and then a Postgraduate diploma in Fine Art at Chelsea (UAL)."
How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "I started working at Tate in late 2012 for the Pre-Raphaelite exhibition. There are endless exhibitions I have seen at the Tate, but my favourite works were the ones exhibited in the Turbine Hall such as the Weather Project (the sun installation) by Olafur Eliasson and Marsyas (the red horn installation) by Anish Kapoor. My favourite spaces are the Tanks and the Turbine Hall."
What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate modern show? "I will be exhibiting one photograph from a series of twenty-four called Nostalgia, which documents a journey through Cyprus and captures the emotions in the form of dream-like images. Inspired by Andrei Tarkovsky’s polaroids, this series is a result of a developed passion for mood, colour and distorted imagery.Using movement, light, expired film and a 120-degree rotating lens camera, the photographs have an appearance of liquid colour or paint. Apart from the removal of dust and sand particles, visible on the images, no other post production was used on this series of photographs.The whole series will be available to view on my website from August."
How can people find out about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? "I am currently working on my website, which will be available from August @ www.natashavassiliou.com You can also find me at my Instagram account @natasha.vassiliou
What's the best thing about working at the Tate? "Other than the artwork and the books, the Tanks is where you’ll find me when I'm not working."
The Tate Staff Biennale will take place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Monday, 1 July 2019

Introducing Helen Dixon

Over 100 artists are taking part in The Tate Staff Biennale which will take place on the last week of August on Level 5 of Tate Modern. Over the next few weeks The Rebel Magazine will be chatting to some of the Tate staff who are showing their artwork. Today it's the turn of Helen Dixon
Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in London and grew up in various corners of South London. My journey through education was a little unusual. From the age of three to eleven I went to a Steiner school in South West London. Steiner education is child-centred and holistic in its approach to teaching, developing the emotional and physical skills of children alongside intellectual ones. It also tends to view art and creativity and the development of the imagination as integral to learning. From here I spent three years at an all girls state school in South Norwood and then four years at the BRIT School (strictly behind the scenes!) leaving at 18. After a break, I completed the Foundation Diploma (drawing pathway) at Camberwell College of Arts and then a BA (Hons) in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts, graduating in 2013."
How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "My first shift was back in March 2014, but I’ve been in and out the building a little since then, both at Tate Britain and Tate Modern. Francis Bacon at Tate Britain in 2008 (a little before my time but hopefully still counts!) was a huge moment for me and my understanding of art. I also loved The Shape of Light last year and Conflict, Time, Photography back in 2014 both at Tate Modern."
What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate modern show? "My practice centres on a fascination with the continuous movement of energy in nature, unending and in constant flux, each emanation wholly interdependent on all others. Big Blue #4 on display in this exhibition, is one from a series of six prints, all of which show the detail of a single wave in isolation, one momentary formation in an ongoing process of continual transformation. The work is made using the cyanotype photographic process, which uses simple chemistry, light and water to produce a Prussian blue image. In this series, autographic line drawings take the place of a photographic negative to create the final print."
How can people find out about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? www.helen-dixon.com and on instagram as @hahahelen
What's the best thing about working at the Tate? "The people. The people you work with, learning about their practices and interests, and those you meet across the counter buying a pencil! I’ve also encountered a lot of incredible art and artists I wouldn’t have otherwise too, which I’m really grateful for."
The Tate Staff Biennale will take place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Sunday, 30 June 2019

Introducing Robert Raynard

Over 100 artists are taking part in The Tate Staff Biennale which will take place on the last week of August on Level 5 of Tate Modern. Over the next few weeks The Rebel Magazine will be chatting to some of the Tate staff who are showing their artwork. Today it's the turn of Robert Raynard
Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in Dakar (Senegal) in 1966. I grew up in a suburb north of Paris in the 1970s and the 1980s went to school to university in Paris where I did a BA in English language and culture studies. As a teenager I was interested mainly in history, culture and had a passion for international cinema, I loved French crime films with Jean Paul Bemondo, Alfred Hitchcock‘s films, also literature, I started to collect postcards too. I only took on photography as a hobby when I was in my early twenties although and this interest has grown into a passion with time."
How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "I came to live in the UK in October 1996 and first worked as a French Language Assistant in east London before taking on a job as a Visitor Assistant mainly at the then Tate Gallery I was employed by Trident Safeguards until 1999. I have been working for the Tate for 20 years, I love the diversity of works in the Tate collection, there are artworks which may appeal and sometimes surprise all kinds of visitors. One of the best shows I have seen in 20 years was definitely the Don McCullin show at Tate Britain but also Soul of A Nation and The Clock (by Christian Marclay) at Tate Modern."
What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate modern show? "My artwork is a photograph I took last year, in August, outside Victoria Station and it is called 1:27 p.m. — Flying Past Little Ben. I took the photograph for the purpose of displaying it in a group photography show called London Presence at Conway Hall. In the photograph time, movement and stillness are key elements, with a pigeon flying past the clock tower at 1:27 p.m only to be captured alongside the ticking of the clock and the gilded statue representing Anna Pavlova on top of the Victoria palace. All of those elements are captured in a brief moment of stillness by the photographer. Time resumed and we know that the brief stillness was replaced by movement which we can only imagine. However the statue‘s will remain paralysed it will remain kind of stoic."
How can people find out about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? "I have got an Instagram account you will find me under the name rob.shots.with. passion however I don‘t have a website yet. I hope you will enjoy visiting my Instagram account here."
What's the best thing about working at the Tate? "The best thing about working at the Tate is the feeling of being part of a community of people, members of staff who can and want to offer our visitors the best welcome, and to introduce them to a great, sometimes unusual collection of artworks and exhibitions. We can also rely on each other and be rewarded for our skills."
The Tate Staff Biennale will take place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Friday, 28 June 2019

Introducing Roman Lokati

Over 150 artists are taking part in The Tate Staff Biennale which will take place on the last week of August on Level 5 of Tate Modern. Over the next few weeks The Rebel Magazine will be chatting to some of the Tate staff who are showing their artwork. Today it's the turn of Roman Lokati.
Where did you grow up and what kind of education did you receive? "I was born in Rota Cadiz, Southern Spain and studied at the School of Art in the city of Cadiz. After I continued my art education at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts where I studied the Foundation Degree in Surface Design and graduated in 2006."
How long have you been working at the Tate and what's the best show you've seen there? "I have been working at the Tate for 4 years. There have been many great shows, including Juan Munoz at the Tate Modern, Anish Kapoor and Peter Doig, and perhaps the best show was the recent David Hockney exhibition as he is one of my favourite artists."
What can you tell me about the work you're exhibiting in the Tate modern show? "This is the culmination of the work I have been making over the last five years, inspired by my own and others experiences of migration to another country. Also people’s experience of travel and the current refugee crisis around the world. Three of my sculptures from the travel series: ‘Lost in the City’ were part of the exhibition entitled ‘No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain held at the Migration Museum in 2017. The 3 pieces I am exhibiting at the Tate Modern represent refugees and migrants who when observed from the side almost seem to disappear. In some way they reflect the invisibility and isolation of the refugee today, but at the same time their humanity, their contribution and their voice. With my work I want to make their stories more visible which is why these sculptures made from steel are painted in primary, bright colours."
How can people find out about your work - do you have a website or do Instagram? https://www.chrom-art.org/2014/12/15/roman-lokati-interview/ Instagram / Roman Lokati
What's the best thing about working at the Tate? "Learning more about British and International Art and the opportunity to meet many of my heroes in person. Also working with a very good team from all departments and interacting with the general public."
The Tate Staff Biennale will take place on Level 6 of the Blavatnik Building of Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

John Peter Askew launches his book 'WE' at The Photographer's Gallery

Last night I attended a launch party for a brilliant photography book by John Peter Askew. You can find out about him: here or by reading this recent article in The Guardian. The book features photos taken in Russia between 1996 and 2017.
Above: Andrew Mania with John Peter Askew
Above: Women and Children Outdoors 2009 by John Peter Askew
John's 384 page book features 164 coloured illustrations and texts by Anya Chulakov, Ian Jeffrey, Alistair Robinson, Lee Triming, and Fatos Ustek. (ISBN 978-3-7356-0543-6) You can buy the book from The Photographer's Gallery or via Kerber